Here’s what you need to know

The governor signed the Cannabis Regulation Act into law in June of 2021 after a special legislative session. The bill paves the way for the statewide legalization of recreational cannabis in New Mexico. April 1 marks the first day recreational cannabis is legal in New Mexico. A store in Las Cruces opened at 12:01 am to a line of people waiting to purchase recreational cannabis. Most stores in Albuquerque will open for recreational sales at 10:00 am Some business that already have a medical marijuana license may open as early as 8:00 amIn Santa Fe, sales can start at 7:00 am Recreational sales in Grants and Las Vegas are allowed at 8:00 am Related Video Above: Colorado town offers advice to New Mexicans ahead of legalization of recreational cannabis salesHere’s what you need to know. Who Regulates Cannabis in New Mexico?The Cannabis Regulation Act authorizes the state to regulate sales of recreational cannabis through the Regulation and Licensing Department. The Cannabis Control Division within the department has set rules to help regulate sales and keep growers, dispensaries and consumers safe. This includes rules for businesses on packaging, labeling and marketing cannabis at retail shops, quality control, testing and inspection of products and plant limits for cultivators. More on the rules set by the Cannabis Control Division on licensing and plant limits can be found here. Who can buy cannabis in New Mexico? Like alcohol, a person must be 21 years old to legally purchase cannabis in the State of New Mexico. Each person purchasing cannabis cannot purchase more than two ounces of cannabis, sixteen grams of a cannabis extract, and eight hundred milligrams of edible cannabis at one time. A person cannot possess the same at one time outside of a person amounts’s residence. Any cannabis in the amounts that exceed two ounces of cannabis, sixteen grams of a cannabis extract, and 800 milligrams of edible cannabis may store the excess inside the person’s residence. The law states the storage cannot be viewed from a public place. Where can cannabis be bought and used in New Mexico? The Cannabis Regulation Act allows local jurisdictions to set their own rules for the use and sale of cannabis. While there are no limits on the number of licenses the Cannabis Control Division may issue, local entities may place limits on the density of licenses, and adopt rules that don’t conflict with the act or the Clean Indoor Air Act. This includes establishing limits on the distance a cannabis retailer can be from schools and daycares. It is also illegal to buy, give or sell cannabis to anyone under 21 years old. To search for a licensed business that sells cannabis, click here.Can you grow cannabis for personal use? Anyone 21 or older can grow six mature plants and six seedlings. You can only have a maximum of 12 mature plants per household. Is Cannabis Legal in New Mexico? It’s complicated. The Cannabis Control Act legalizes recreational cannabis in New Mexico. However, it is still illegal at the federal level.

The governor signed the Cannabis Regulation Act into law in June of 2021 after a special legislative session.

The bill paves the way for the statewide legalization of recreational cannabis in New Mexico.

April 1 marks the first day recreational cannabis is legal in New Mexico.

A store in Las Cruces opened at 12:01 am to a line of people waiting to purchase recreational cannabis.

Most stores in Albuquerque will open for recreational sales at 10:00 am Some business that already has a medical marijuana license may open as early as 8:00 am

In Santa Fe, sales can start at 7:00 am Recreational sales in Grants and Las Vegas are allowed at 8:00 am

Related Video Above: Colorado town offers advice to New Mexicans ahead of legalization of recreational cannabis sales

Here’s what you need to know.

Who Regulates Cannabis in New Mexico?

The Cannabis Regulation Act authorizes the state to regulate sales of recreational cannabis through the Regulation and Licensing Department. The Cannabis Control Division within the department has set rules to help regulate sales and keep growers, dispensaries and consumers safe. This includes rules for businesses on packaging, labeling and marketing cannabis at retail shops, quality control, testing and inspection of products and plant limits for cultivators.

More on the rules set by the Cannabis Control Division on licensing and plant limits can be found here.

Who can buy cannabis in New Mexico?

Like alcohol, a person must be 21 years old to legally purchase cannabis in the State of New Mexico. Each person purchasing cannabis cannot purchase more than two ounces of cannabis, sixteen grams of a cannabis extract, and eight hundred milligrams of edible cannabis at one time. A person cannot possess the same at one time outside of a person amounts’s residence. Any cannabis in the amounts that exceed two ounces of cannabis, sixteen grams of a cannabis extract, and 800 milligrams of edible cannabis may store the excess inside the person’s residence. The law states the storage cannot be viewed from a public place.

Where can cannabis be bought and used in New Mexico?

The Cannabis Regulation Act allows local jurisdictions to set their own rules for the use and sale of cannabis. While there are no limits on the number of licenses the Cannabis Control Division may issue, local entities may place limits on the density of licenses, and adopt rules that don’t conflict with the act or the Clean Indoor Air Act. This includes establishing limits on the distance a cannabis retailer can be from schools and daycares. It is also illegal to buy, give or sell cannabis to anyone under 21 years old.

To search for a licensed business that sells cannabis, click here.

Can you grow cannabis for personal use?

Anyone 21 or older can grow six mature plants and six seedlings. You can only have a maximum of 12 mature plants per household.

Is Cannabis Legal in New Mexico?

It’s complicated. The Cannabis Control Act legalizes recreational cannabis in New Mexico. However, it is still illegal at the federal level.

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